Thursday, 19 November 2020

Around the House

 Around the house.  Where else would I be?



I'm baking sourdough bread again.  This dough was over proofed and didn't rise in the oven.  It was also very tangy.  The sourdough has been going for months and I don't feed it often enough.  The taste gets stronger the more you let it ferment.  Traditional people like tangy dense sourdough so I'm calling this a success.

I've still got about 10 kilos of that darn flour that was infested with weevils.  The weevils have been exterminated but I don't like the flour.  It is too coarse.  I use it for cakes and biscuits too and they all turn out ok but not as good as they should.

I just wish I could use up all that flour and get some more, of a different kind.  My bread came out much lighter and the rise was higher with my last bag of bread flour.  Even the kids don't want this.




Last Sunday we had a family visit and the grandaughters got out all the Christmas decorations, put up the tree and hung the big red balls from the rafters.  Yes, it's early, too early for me but we may not see them again till late in December, or even January.

I love my 'Pukeko in a Ponga Tree' book of course.  Its the 12 days of xmas kiwi style.  And there at the back are NZ christmas recipes.  Good old kiwi christmas cakes and mince pie recipes.


We didn't miss out on the quinces this year as I was hoping.  Our neighbours were able to come from Athens to pick their olives and they delivered us a big bag of quinces and pomegranites.

  I got to work and cleaned the outsides of the quinces with a very sharp knife and boiled all the fruit.  I then added sugar and pureed it.  Now what to do with it.  Some went into a fruit chutney I made, some went into the freezer and now I'm contemplating making a quince sauce cake or tart.  The kids didn't want the quinces either.

    


And the pommegranites.  

The pommegranites are disappearing one by one.  They are lovely in salads.



28 comments:

  1. How did you get rid of the weevils?

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    1. After I sifted the obvious ones out, from 25ks of darn flour I then bagged it all and put all the bags in the freezer. The freezer kills anything that is left.
      I never want to do that again!!

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  2. I envy you the pomegranates. You have given us an idea for Christmas presents for the two local great-grand daughters. I have just messaged the Mum of the eldest one to see if they already have the Pukeko in a Ponga Tree.

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    1. The Pukeko book is simply wonderful. Weve had it for years. Im sure any kiwi kid or adult would enjoy it

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  3. My Pomegranates don't ripen, they just look nice on the tree.

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    1. These ones have been ripening for ages and the owner was absent in Athens. The whole neighbourhood was worried they would fall and rot. He came back just in time to share them out

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  4. I live in Spain and a popular use of quinces is to make it into membrillo paste and serve with manchego cheese which is quite strong in flavour. Google membrillo for recipes. Chris

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    1. I would love to make some of that. I think I did try one year but cant remember how successful it was. I still have 3 quinces left so will make this. Thanks

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    2. Membrillo is pretty good on graviera too.

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  5. The bread looks wonderful. Makes me sorry I'm not that good at baking.

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    1. I was not a good bread maker in the beginning. I had many failures with the yeast and still do now and again. Its the sourdough that is a little more difficult. We dont go out for bread everyday (almost) like we used to so I shall make some more sourdough and hope it turns out how I like it. K will eat it whatever happens.

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  6. I didn't know you could do other things with quinces - I've only ever made quince jelly with them.

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    1. Anything you do with apples you can do with quince though they always need a little more sugar I think

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  7. we always think pomegranates on the tree look like Christmas baubles. Such great Xmas fruit.

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    1. They are very decorative, and in the bowl on my table

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  8. we get quince cheese for christmas to go with the cheese board, everyone raves about it. I think it might be membrillo mentioned in the above comment.

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    1. I think it is the same. Just the sort by of thing I'd love with cheese

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  9. I used to have the Pukeko in a Ponga tree when the boys were little, happy memories.

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  10. The thought of all of those weevils... yuk!! I'm sure in the 'old' days most flour would have been full of weevils. I have never successfully made bread but I love sour dough bread. I love all the Kiwi Christmas books, my grandsons have a few of them.

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    1. Weevils are common here with the summer heat but it's the first time in years we had an infestation. I was not amused

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  11. I love your kiwi recipe book - funnily enough sourdough bread is one my tummy can handle and it's yummy.

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    1. That kiwi recipe book comes out every year at this time.

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  13. You might be able to reduce the coarseness of the flour by putting it in a food processor for a few minutes (or more? never done it before). It's certainly worth a try!
    My husband bought some lovely pomegranates last week, and they are great in salad!

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    1. I might try that for the next loaves. Good idea

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