local-kiwi-alien

Thursday, 15 April 2021

End of the Walk

 The little church which I walk to most days


Dedicated to Saint John, Agio Yianni.  Has a special service every year around 24 September but otherwise is only used for a baptism or a special service of thanks or a request for someone's good health


The Priest emerges from behind the curtain to conduct the service. Women are not allowed back there.


The church is always open and sometimes we go in and light the little olive oil lamp, a glass of oil with a floating wick, leave a few coins in the money box, take and light a candle


Anyone may, and does, walk in and light a candle.
See the glass on the right which has a layer of oil on the top. This is the simple lamp.  The oil can be topped up from a bottle on the window ledge behind.  Sometimes we take a small bottle of oil and leave it there.  Also you'll find a box of wicks there in case it needs replacing, incense and charcoal. 
The charcoal pieces are placed in a small burner, the incense on top.  The charcoal is set alight and if you're so inclined you can wave it around and say a prayer


The walls are covered in icons of various saints donated by the faithful




Church of Saint John
One of two or three on the island dedicated to the Saint


21 comments:

  1. So how old are the churches because the one in the bottom photo looks like it's a good age.

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    1. This church would have been built in the early 19-somethings. The oldest ones are in town.

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  2. I love how the churches in Greece are open and everyone just goes in and takes care of everything
    It happens here in the Greek section of the cemetery if my mum can’t get to my brothers grave for whatever reason. One of the others lights the candle and gives it a wipe down for her.

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    1. K is always lighting candles for various members of his family gone but not forgotten. It's not often we find one of these little ones locked

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  3. How interesting, and so much history...
    ~Jo

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  4. Oh those tiny churches. We went inside so many while in Greece. Some old and run down and others, like those in Santorini, all bright and spruced up for tourists! They are all gorgeous.

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    1. A family usually looks after each church so they are mostly clean, with oil for the lamps and candles to light

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  5. Beautiful. I'm not a religious person, but I loved visiting those little chapels in odd out-of-the-way places.

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    1. I feel exactly the same way. I often light a candle. I've heard the first candle should be for ourselves!!

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  6. Do some of the big posh hur hes have a small chapel beside where people can 'nip in' and pay their respects? A couple near here seem to have this candle lighting feature in a tiny church at street level - almost always with a well blackened interior surface.

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    1. The three big churches here do have a little better be just metres away. I'd never thought of that before. The smaller ones have a much more welcoming feeling.

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  7. That's big posh churches (fat fingers tying sorry)

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    1. I know the feeling. Sometimes I wonder how my comments are understood at all

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  8. Nice the church is open all the time for people to go in and light a candle. Lovely little building.

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    1. We have 8 of these little ones just in our small area. I wonder how many there are on the island

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  9. Lovely old church in the last photo.

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    1. I usually take the photo of this church from the front but from this side it has more character

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  10. How lovely, I keep saying I would love to come and visit, but I wonder if the opportunity will ever present itself. It would be nice to be able to walk down the road, I have a 20 min drive. Which isn't too bad....but I have looked at the tiny houses around the church I attend and wish....

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    1. Very different here.in town where we lived we were 5 minutes by foot from our big church, heard the bells toll for the dead, saw the priest doing his daily duty. You're a long way away

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  11. Big churches might have a lot of character but I love these small little churches for their friendly atmosphere. You have some lovely traditions in Greece.

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