Wednesday, 28 November 2018

Pictorial Poros Under Cloudy Skies


Teeming with tourists in the summer this old jetty is usually framed by never ending blue skies and sea churned by boats and humans.
Now the waters are people free, wonderful to walk and contemplate in an easy silence, dressed warmly in shoes and jacket, no blistering sun


The narrow canal linking the two small islands, Spheria and Kalavria which make up Poros



The canal at its narrowest, just big enough for a small fishing boat to pass through





Small church dedicated to the Virgin Mary at the end of Askeli Bay
We have held family church services and baptisms here and attended weddings.  The church is so small that only the priest, chanter and a few bods fit inside.  The services and ceremonies take place in the yard outside the church under the gum trees, beside the sea




Another view of the church
Unused in the winter, except for a rare family service



The way to the two most visited sites on Poros, the ancient temple, not much left to see, and the monastery, with one very strict monk who remains there.  Woe betide if  women should enter in trousers or bare shoulders




Down on the waterfront, one of the few tavernas still open and then only on weekends in the winter

10 comments:

  1. That first photo, is the picture of tranquility. At least, near the ocean. As tranquil as the ocean ever gets. It is so lovely.

    The tavern only opens on weekends in winter. I suppose they make enough, during high tourist season, to take it easy, in winter. Wise!

    So much blue. Suppose it is a sort of a national color....

    ๐ŸŽ„ ๐ŸŽ„ ๐ŸŽ„ ๐ŸŽ„ ๐ŸŽ„ ๐ŸŽ„

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Just not enough people around to make it worth while. Only a couple of the dozens of tavernas stay open during the winter. A few more open on a Saturday night or for Sunday lunch or a long weekend if the weather forecast os good and people will drive round from Athens for the weekend.

      Delete
  2. I love those little chapels. I remember in Kos, finding them in the most remote places. They all had arched roofs, and often contained boxes of bones. Here in France we find stone plinths with metal crosses set into them; again they crop up anywhere, and no-one seems to know why. I have a neighbour who has one in his garden, and he has no idea why it's there.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm still puzzled about those boxes of bones. Must be Kos thing. Metal cross on a plinth. Can't imagine either what that may be.

      Delete
  3. This little tour has been a delight - your cloudy skies are so much brighter than ours and the little chapel is beautiful, I love the simplicity. The canal photographs had me imagining my younger brother sailing down there, though I'm not quite sure how he would get his narrow boat to Poros in the first place!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Love your brothers blog. You're an entertaining family

      Delete
  4. The canal does look quite narrow, does that mean the boats are also quite thin?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The boats are for one or two people, an oversized dinghy. Ours has a cabin and won't fit under the bridge

      Delete
  5. It would be lovely to be able to walk around with no one else anywhere near you
    Once the tourists are gone. You know winter is on the way
    Enjoy the solitude

    ReplyDelete