Saturday, 12 December 2020

More From Home

 Just everyday stuff around here, until further notice. 

The kitchen window.


Trying to grow 2 avocado pips.  No sign of any roots yet.
Our celery, called selino, comes with leaves and stalks and roots.  I have now planted this one in a pot and I have put another bunch of celery roots in a container with water.  They grow fast and nearly always 'take'.  

Our selino is green and leafy and looks like parsley.  Sometimes the only way to tell the difference is to bite one of the leaves.

Celery, or selery here, are the big tall stalks which we know elsewhere


3 jars of pickled onions.  Slowly pickling in brine and honey




















18 comments:

  1. Those pickles look great. We only seem to be able to purchase silverskins skins this year. Your pickles would make great Christmas presents.

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    1. Unfortunately I couldn't find small onions at all and had to make do with big ones. Some I cut in quarters and some into halves. They taste the same.
      Two jars go out to english friends at xmas and I keep one for us

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  2. I didn't realise that celery could be so easy to grow on a windowsill. I must try it, if I can find some seeds.

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    1. You don't even need to plant this in a pot. Even in its container of water it produces green leaves. Grows very easily

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  3. does selino grow wild? is it picked and eaten like horta? or used as a salad leaf

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    1. You'd think it would grow wild but it doesn't. We have to buy bunches from the grocer but at least it is sold with the roots so we can plant it and produce our own

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    2. when we get celery from supermarket I always root it and then it grows stunted and is just leaves. I use the leaves like a herb or as a salad leaf I am wondering if this is what you have there

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  4. I don't like them but the pickled onions look good.

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  5. I have had success with two avocado seeds so far, they took about 3 months for the root to appear, then a bit longer for the shoot to come out the top. Your pickled onions look wonderful .

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    1. Thank you for telling me about your avocados . I know they take a long time . I will be very patient!

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  6. I guess we all have different ways to cope with being indoors. Yours look delicious!
    You asked what we were doing in Matiere on the rail trip. It was the turn-around point for the adapted golf carts used on the rail lines. I have edited my post so others aren't confused, too!

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    1. Thanks for the explanation. I did wonder. I thought it might have some hidden attraction

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  7. I looked for 'pickling onions' last Friday when I went shopping.... none!

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    1. We usually get smaller onions which are used in a Greek recipe, rabbit with onions. Even these were not available

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  8. Never heard of putting honey in pickled onions before but sounds like a great idea. I prefer the sweet onions from the shop. I don't make them any more as Tom always seems to choke on the vinegar,lol
    Briony
    x

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    1. The honey us not enough to make them sweet but certainly it dilutes that vinegary taste. They seem popular with friends. A recipe my mother used to make

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  9. oh yes! pickled onions are a huge favourite in our household

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  10. Just everyday stuff... What else do we blog about?

    Happy Week Before Christmas!
    πŸŽ„ πŸ”₯ πŸŽ„ πŸ”₯ πŸŽ„ πŸ”₯ πŸŽ„ πŸ”₯ πŸŽ„

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